compoundchem:

A look at some of the chemical compounds that can be used to colour paint. Not all of these are still in use - for example, cadmium & chromium compounds are toxic, so their use is now rare. You can read more about the cause of the colours here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-8N
Thanks to ve-ve-whats-cooler-than-cool for the question that inspired this graphic!

compoundchem:

A look at some of the chemical compounds that can be used to colour paint. Not all of these are still in use - for example, cadmium & chromium compounds are toxic, so their use is now rare. You can read more about the cause of the colours here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-8N

Thanks to ve-ve-whats-cooler-than-cool for the question that inspired this graphic!

774 notes

compoundchem:

Chemical structures of neurotransmitters poster (http://wp.me/p4aPLT-6C ) now up in the the site shop: http://goo.gl/Qp2mMQ ! A2, A1, and A0 sizes available.The aromatic chemistry reaction map is also now available.

compoundchem:

Chemical structures of neurotransmitters poster () now up in the the site shop: ! A2, A1, and A0 sizes available.

The aromatic chemistry reaction map is also now available.

743 notes

thecraftychemist:

Minute physics explains magnetic levitation

Video source

452 notes

science-junkie:

Particles and Matter
According to the Standard Model, ordinary matter is made of fermions, or rather, by the first-generation fermion particles, namely, electrons and up and down quarks, which make up protons and neutrons in various combinations (approximately, a proton is made by the combination u-u-d, while a neutron by the combination u-d-d). The particles of the second and third generations have a larger mass, so they are highly unstable and can only be produced in the laboratory.
I’m not quite clear on the last part of the ask. Quarks are indeed researched through smashing, but their existence was first hypothesized theoretically by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964. Then the hypothesis was confirmed at the end of the sixties from studies conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC ). When high energy electrons were fired at protons and neutrons —analyzing the energy and angular distribution of electrons— they observed that some of these electrons were bumping into electrically charged, point-like objects contained inside protons and neutrons, proving in this way quarks’ existence. 
So, the atom is not the smallest particle, but the use of subatomic particles makes sense only in nuclear physics. The other physical and chemical processes make sense at the atomic level and, in fact, the atom is now defined as the smallest unit of an element that retains all the element’s properties.
Image: [x]Asked by whovians-in-purgatory 

science-junkie:

Particles and Matter

According to the Standard Model, ordinary matter is made of fermions, or rather, by the first-generation fermion particles, namely, electrons and up and down quarks, which make up protons and neutrons in various combinations (approximately, a proton is made by the combination u-u-d, while a neutron by the combination u-d-d). The particles of the second and third generations have a larger mass, so they are highly unstable and can only be produced in the laboratory.

I’m not quite clear on the last part of the ask. Quarks are indeed researched through smashing, but their existence was first hypothesized theoretically by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964. Then the hypothesis was confirmed at the end of the sixties from studies conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC ). When high energy electrons were fired at protons and neutrons —analyzing the energy and angular distribution of electrons— they observed that some of these electrons were bumping into electrically charged, point-like objects contained inside protons and neutrons, proving in this way quarks’ existence. 

So, the atom is not the smallest particle, but the use of subatomic particles makes sense only in nuclear physics. The other physical and chemical processes make sense at the atomic level and, in fact, the atom is now defined as the smallest unit of an element that retains all the element’s properties.

Image: [x]
Asked by whovians-in-purgatory 

561 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Best of 2013!

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

4,386 notes

BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL NYE THE SCIENCE GUY

(Source: commie-pinko-liberal)

390,615 notes

thecraftychemist:

Emissions spectra

Each of these tubes is filled with a pure elemental gas* before being excited with 20,000 V. This causes the electrons in the atoms to jump to higher energy states which then emit light when they relax back down.

The light emissions have been diffracted here to show the individual wavelength components, each of which represent the jumps electrons in a particular element can make.

This is an important tool in identification and is used in techniques like ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma), and FAA (Flame Atomic Absorption) where samples are vaporized/excited under controlled conditions to measure the light they emit.

This equipment is so sensitive it can detect down to the parts per trillion (1 gram /1 million tonnes) and billion range respectively when coupled with a mass spectrometer.

Video source

Other sources: 1. 2. 3.

*Except the air which is mainly nitrogen and oxygen.

(Source: tumblr.com)

903 notes

ggeology:

Rhodochrosite with Quartz on Tetrahedrite // Colorado, USA

ggeology:

Rhodochrosite with Quartz on Tetrahedrite // Colorado, USA

243 notes